Tags: , , , , ,

An international study reveals Australians hide their depression at work more than employees in other countries, fearing misunderstanding, stigma, and discrimination.*

We interviewed Michele Chevalley Hedge, a nutritionist and wellbeing author on how she assists corporations to implement strategies to raise awareness of depression and mental illness.  Michele shares and educates on how evidence-based nutritional and lifestyle improvements can make significant improvements in mental, physical and emotional wellbeing.

 

  • We know that the perceived stigma attached to mental ill-health inhibits people from disclosing mental health issues. What advice do you have to help shift the narrative around mental wellbeing?

“The stigma is becoming less and less the more we talk about it and educate ourselves.  My advice about shifting the conversation is exactly that …. ‘conversation’.  The more we discuss, listen and learn about what are risk factors for depression, anxiety and mood disorders the more we understand that these disorders can be multifactorial- genetics, virus, toxins, illness- many of which we cannot control BUT there are some factors that we can control like what we eat.  We know now in 2019 that food and its nutrients can help improve this common health condition crippling the workplace and robbing people from joy within themselves and their families.”

 

  • Our mental wellbeing is unique to each of us, so throughout our internal Mental Wellbeing Month, we are encouraging our people to explore different self-care tools that could work for them. What are some examples of the self-care tools you use?

“Our sleep, exercise, nutrition and stress hackers* are the 4 pillars of my clients’ physical as well as mental wellbeing.  The healthiest mentally, emotionally and physically people I know protect these 4 pillars, consistently- daily- without excuses or compromise

BUT not in a punishing way – a nourishing way!  Improvements to our wellbeing, diet, and lifestyle do not need to be restrictive and punishing, in fact, if they are they will not have the same success rate we have with small micro changes.”

*stress hackers – the small, easy to do daily things that bring down your cortisol  (stress hormone) like deep breathing, walking, reading, listening to a Calm app, sitting in the sun for 15 minutes,  meditation, yoga, having an uninterrupted cup of tea without your own monkey chatter

  • What do you think are the top 3 benefits for organizations that encourage a positive dialogue around mental wellbeing?

“The top three? … no… there are literally hundreds of benefits to an organisation taking on positive dialogue and education around mental wellbeing.  You don’t need to be a psychologist to know that mental health is silent, scary, and often leads to exhaustion, low self-esteem, and self-abuse.  When a person doesn’t feel that they are alone, they are being supported, and there may be other option that has not considered to help improve their wellbeing they begin to look through a more positive lens.  Small, ‘do-able’ micro habits may be enough to make significant changes to their productivity, energy levels, creative and strategic thinking, leadership skills, and ability to connect. Talk about employees hitting their KPI 😉 and a company getting ROI“

  • How do role models play an invaluable part in creating a safe environment for people to be open and seek support for mental wellbeing?

“Roles models can be the gateway or the bridge that can create the catalyst for seeking support for mental wellbeing.  I have witnessed countless corporations open up the conversation on mental wellbeing and it brings a ‘realness’ and ‘authenticity’ to their corporate culture.  This has a knockoff effect to being positive and connected – with an employee and a business. “

Michele Chevalley Hedge is a nutritionist and health author.  Her new book, Eat, Drink & Still Shrink… a busy person’s joyful guide to wellbeing has just been internationally released.  For more information go to www.ahealthyview.com.

If you like this article, please click the share buttons below.

An international study reveals Australians hide their depression at work more than employees in other countries, fearing misunderstanding, stigma, and discrimination.*

We interviewed Michele Chevalley Hedge, a nutritionist and wellbeing author on how she assists corporations to implement strategies to raise awareness of depression and mental illness.  Michele shares and educates on how evidence-based nutritional and lifestyle improvements can make significant improvements in mental, physical and emotional wellbeing.

 

  • We know that the perceived stigma attached to mental ill-health inhibits people from disclosing mental health issues. What advice do you have to help shift the narrative around mental wellbeing?

“The stigma is becoming less and less the more we talk about it and educate ourselves.  My advice about shifting the conversation is exactly that …. ‘conversation’.  The more we discuss, listen and learn about what are risk factors for depression, anxiety and mood disorders the more we understand that these disorders can be multifactorial- genetics, virus, toxins, illness- many of which we cannot control BUT there are some factors that we can control like what we eat.  We know now in 2019 that food and its nutrients can help improve this common health condition crippling the workplace and robbing people from joy within themselves and their families.”

 

  • Our mental wellbeing is unique to each of us, so throughout our internal Mental Wellbeing Month, we are encouraging our people to explore different self-care tools that could work for them. What are some examples of the self-care tools you use?

“Our sleep, exercise, nutrition and stress hackers* are the 4 pillars of my clients’ physical as well as mental wellbeing.  The healthiest mentally, emotionally and physically people I know protect these 4 pillars, consistently- daily- without excuses or compromise

BUT not in a punishing way – a nourishing way!  Improvements to our wellbeing, diet, and lifestyle do not need to be restrictive and punishing, in fact, if they are they will not have the same success rate we have with small micro changes.”

*stress hackers – the small, easy to do daily things that bring down your cortisol  (stress hormone) like deep breathing, walking, reading, listening to a Calm app, sitting in the sun for 15 minutes,  meditation, yoga, having an uninterrupted cup of tea without your own monkey chatter

  • What do you think are the top 3 benefits for organizations that encourage a positive dialogue around mental wellbeing?

“The top three? … no… there are literally hundreds of benefits to an organisation taking on positive dialogue and education around mental wellbeing.  You don’t need to be a psychologist to know that mental health is silent, scary, and often leads to exhaustion, low self-esteem, and self-abuse.  When a person doesn’t feel that they are alone, they are being supported, and there may be other option that has not considered to help improve their wellbeing they begin to look through a more positive lens.  Small, ‘do-able’ micro habits may be enough to make significant changes to their productivity, energy levels, creative and strategic thinking, leadership skills, and ability to connect. Talk about employees hitting their KPI 😉 and a company getting ROI“

  • How do role models play an invaluable part in creating a safe environment for people to be open and seek support for mental wellbeing?

“Roles models can be the gateway or the bridge that can create the catalyst for seeking support for mental wellbeing.  I have witnessed countless corporations open up the conversation on mental wellbeing and it brings a ‘realness’ and ‘authenticity’ to their corporate culture.  This has a knockoff effect to being positive and connected – with an employee and a business. “

Michele Chevalley Hedge is a nutritionist and health author.  Her new book, Eat, Drink & Still Shrink… a busy person’s joyful guide to wellbeing has just been internationally released.  For more information go to www.ahealthyview.com.

If you like this article, please click the share buttons below.

Pin It on Pinterest